Cairo, Egypt

Food And People By Charlie Grosso

"Wok the Dog" is a long term photographic series that examines the commerce of meat, the market place around the world. Since 2004, I have photographed markets in 20 countries and 74 cities. For more about Arab markets, read my past Food and People posts about the Moroccan cities of Fez, Casablanca, and Kamil.

I was in Cairo during Eid Al-Adha, Feast of Abraham, which is a high holiday in the Islamic calendar. The markets were nearly all shut down and there were little business going on.

The quietness of the market had a different quality all together. It was like going back stage during rehearsal and seeing a different truth behind the show.

The empty crates and the empty cages speak to the respect for the high holidays and people's devotion. There is nothing left as everything is an offering of faith. These images of Cairo are especially poignant to me as I was in Cairo just mere 6 weeks before the protest that brought down a regime. Markets are absorbs the culture, the politics and the religion and reflects it back at you. These are the last images of a Cairo market as it was.

If you are in NYC during March and April, come and see images from "Wok the Dog" in person at HousProjects in SoHo. For more images from Wok the Dog and information, visits: www.charliegrosso.com

Every Thursday, we'll be posting snapshots from different spots around the world and encourage you to do the same. You can share your photos by emailing us at FoodandPeople@SamuelssonGroup.com You can also submit a post on Tumblrwhich we review before posting our favorites here on MarcusSamuelsson.com

Click on any photo to view in slideshow mode.

A Small Town Called Kamil In Morocco

Food and People By Charlie Grosso

"Wok the Dog" is a long term photographic series that examines the commerce of meat, the market place around the world. Since 2004, I have photographed markets in 20 countries and 74 cities. For more international adventures, read my past Food and People posts about Luxor, Casablanca, Fez, and Masaya.

A friend took me out to a small town called Kamil, Morocco just before Eid Al-Adha, Feast of Abraham. It was market day and there were sheep everywhere.

Every family buys a sheep and sacrifices it for God during Eid and sheep is nearly all you see. They put strap the sheep down on top of buses, in the trucks of cars, push it home in wheel barrels or simply throw it over their shoulder and haul it out. Not only were there live sheep everywhere, the butchers were selling lamb and mutton as well. The one chicken vendor was almost a novelty in amidst the frenzy of Eid.

If you are in NYC during March and April, come and see images from "Wok the Dog" in person at HousProjects in SoHo. For more images from Wok the Dog and information, visits: www.charliegrosso.com

Every Thursday, we'll be posting snapshots from different spots around the world and encourage you to do the same. You can share your photos by emailing us at FoodandPeople@SamuelssonGroup.com You can also submit a post on Tumblr which we review before posting our favorites here on MarcusSamuelsson.com

Click on any photo to view in slideshow mode.

Fez, Morocco: The City Out Of Fairy Tales

Food and People By Charlie Grosso

"Wok the Dog" is a long term photographic series that examines the commerce of meat, the market place around the world. Since 2004, I have photographed markets in 20 countries and 74 cities. For more international adventures, read my past Food and People posts about Luxor, Masaya, and Casablanca.

The sand colored city of Fez, Morocco appears to be a city out of fairy tales. The city seems like it never quiet entered the modern century much less the 21st. There are still vendors selling coal. And one butcher shop in the medina that sold Camel.

I've always thought that Camels were expensive and highly prized by the Arabs and seeing the camel head outside the butcher shop with the camel hoofs on the ground was certainly a shock.

I wish I spoke French or Arabic better to ask about the taste, cost and selling of camels in Arab culture.

If you are in NYC during March and April, come and see images from "Wok the Dog" in person at HousProjects in SoHo. For more images from Wok the Dog and information, visits: www.charliegrosso.com

Every Thursday, we'll be posting snapshots from different spots around the world and encourage you to do the same. You can share your photos by emailing us at FoodandPeople@SamuelssonGroup.com You can also submit a post on Tumblr which we review before posting our favorites here on MarcusSamuelsson.com

Click on any photo to view in slideshow mode.

Casablanca, Morocco

Food and People By Charlie Grosso

"Wok the Dog" is a long term photographic series that examines the commerce of meat, the market place around the world. Since 2004, I have photographed markets in 20 countries and 74 cities. For more international adventures, read my past Food and People posts about Luxor and Masaya.

Humphrey Bogart might be the only association you have with Casablanca, Morocco. Yet Bogart is absent from the markets of Casablanca. What is abundant is the a sense of poetry.

The French influence is unmistakable. It telegraphs itself throughout the market and I am surprised by its appearance. Take stall number 14 for example. I feel like I am looking a rendering of Paris in early 1900s, yet it is Casablanca in modern day. A little bit of the old along with a little bit of the new comes together in the markets of Casablanca.

If you are in NYC during March and April, come and see images from "Wok the Dog" in person at HousProjects in SoHo. For more images from Wok the Dog and information, visit: www.charliegrosso.com

Every Thursday, we'll be posting snapshots from different spots around the world and encourage you to do the same. You can share your photos by emailing us at FoodandPeople@SamuelssonGroup.com You can also submit a post on Tumblr which we review before posting our favorites here on MarcusSamuelsson.com

Click on any photo to view in slideshow mode.

Luxor, Egypt

Food and People By Charlie Grosso

"Wok the Dog" is a long term photographic series that examines the  commerce of meat, the market place around the world. Since 2004, I have photographed markets in 20 countries and 74 cities. For another international adventures, read my past Food and People post about Masaya.

I arrived in Luxor, Egypt just after Eid Al-Adha, Feast of Abraham. Markets were closed during the high holidays and the markets in Luxor were gradually awaking itself and reassembling. There were butcher shops in the most uncommon places, down a strange alley way on your way to the main drag, for example.

Complete sides of cow hang down from hooks just outside the shop while butchers break down the carcass right there on the street. The masculine nature of Islamic culture is on view here as men out numbers women in the markets.  Friendly vendors smile at me as I seem to the be only traveler who is willing to stay a minute and not hurry through in disgust like the other tourists. The markets are not a novelty to me. The market is the authentic view on any culture one can have.

If you are in NYC during March and April, come and see images from "Wok the Dog" in person at HousProjects in SoHo.   For more images from Wok the Dog and information, visits: www.charliegrosso.com